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5 Reasons Your Prospects Will Never Come Back to Your Website - echogravity
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5 Reasons Your Prospects Will Never Come Back to Your Website

5 Reasons Your Prospects Will Never Come Back to Your Website

WebsiteYour prospects used to come to your website in order to see that you are a legitimate company with a viable street address. It was also a sexy thing to have a cool website with moving parts and tons of buzz words that talk about how great your company is in your particular market. Wow, how things have changed…

Not only is having a website an expectation, but there are new requirements for companies looking to generate interest among their prospects and customers. A website with fresh content, new media, and educational material will give your company a competitive advantage in todays digital age. However, things continue to evolve very quickly, so if you want to engage your visitors, you better start generating content, materials and interesting “stuff” for them to look at.

If you don’t keep up with the movement, you’ll likely be telling your visitors to not come back. Ask yourself if your website falls into one or more of these categories:

  • Don’t update your news or current events in over 6 months. Nothing is more uninviting than telling your visitors that the past 2 quarters in your company have included absolutely nothing worthy of mentioning.
  • Provide zero education relating to your industry or space. If you are good at what you do, let your visitors know that you get it. If you aren’t helping them better understand or grasp information, your competition will. Your prospects will either read your materials or your competitors. You decide who will get the face time.
  • Build a blog that dies on the vine. I’ve seen so many companies start a blog because it is the in thing to do. The ones that continue with the content are those that get the traffic. Statistics show that sites with an active blog generate more traffic than those without. If yours dies mid way through its lifecycle, your visitors will also wonder whether or not your company is surviving or is a viable company to purchase products or services from.
  • Keep your website design exactly the same for over 2 years. There are cycles of standard look and feel concepts. About every two years, the look changes, and it’s important to roll with those changes in order to avoid looking dated. Building new websites is far easier than it used to be, and keeping a fresh look is vital to keeping your visitors coming back to check it out.
  • Start a social presence and don’t maintain it. Much like the blog dying on the vine, not maintaining a social presence has the same effect. Those companies that get social with Twitter or Facebook and then stop the presses, end up looking stale. You are better off not being on the social web, than to start it and not maintain it.

It’s hard work keeping up with a web site that involves various content activities. However, it’s becoming a standard mode of operation. If you don’t have a team of people that will manage your website effectively, you should think about getting one. With the current buying trends and processes changing as quickly as they are, it is critical to a business’ success to keep your new and returning visitor traffic high.